Key Contacts:

Mr Dominic Singleton – d.singleton@hanhamwoods.academy – Curriculum Leader for Humanities and Subject Leader for History

History:

Mrs Sara Hutchinson – Teacher
Mrs Adele Fletcher – Teacher
Mr Matthew Stevenson – Teacher

Key Stage 3 (Years 7 & 8) students receive 2 x 50 minute lessons each week

Key Stage 4 (Years 9 – 11)students receive 3 x 50 minute lessons per week

History is about people and people are complex, fascinating and frustrating. This means that studying History is intriguing, inspiring, alarming, heartening and disturbing. By studying History we engage with stories about progress and civilisation as well as stories about catastrophe and inhumanity. History is also society’s memory bank. This means that, in changing times, an understanding of History is vital for young people in helping them to understand our world. Societies where people understand History are societies which will avoid making the mistakes of the past.

At Hanham Woods, we believe that History is important for all the above reasons. We also believe that, for individual students, it is important, not just for the knowledge it teaches us, but for the skills it helps young people to develop. Young people who have studied History have usually developed a number of transferable skills such as the ability to think logically, the ability to argue a case both orally and on paper, the ability to draw conclusions from evidence and to differentiate between the truth, on the one hand, and opinion and propaganda on the other. Students with good History qualifications often go on to careers in Journalism, the Law and Politics, Accounting, Business and Management, Education and many others.

Geography :

Mrs Christy Fisher c.fisher@hanhanwoods.academy & Mr James Littlejohns j.littlejohns@hanhamwoods.academy – Subject Leader’s for Geography:

Mrs Emma Dawson – Teacher

Mrs Joanna Lukas – Teacher

KS3 students receive 2 x 50 minute lessons each week.

KS4 students receive 3 x 50 minute lessons per week.

Geography inspires students to become global citizens by exploring their own place in the world, their values and responsibilities to other people, to the environment and to the sustainability of the planet. Geography will give you the chance to get to grips with some of the big questions which affect our world and understand the social, economic and physical forces and processes which shape and change our world.

PRE (Philosophy, Religion & Ethics):

Mrs Kim Van-Meir k.vanmeir@hanhamwoods.academy – Subject Leader for PRE 

KS3 students receive I x 50 minute lessons each week.

KS4 students receive 3 x 50 minute lessons per week.

PRE-is about people and their beliefs, beliefs are multifaceted, interesting and challenging. This means that studying PRE is interesting, baffling and sometimes distressing. By studying PRE we engage with stories about religious beliefs and actions that can sometimes be inspiring and other time completely baffling.

The History Curriculum Statement sets out the vision and intent for the curriculum in History.

The History Curriculum Map sets out an overview of the curriculum in History from Years 7 through to Year 11.  Among other things, it sets out what is studied, why it is studied, as well as the keywords needed in each year.  Students and parents are likely to find this useful.

At Hanham Woods Academy we encourage students to think like Historians in their History lessons.  The Hanham Thinkers History poster summarises what that means.

At Hanham Woods Academy, History is compulsory for students at Key Stage 3. Most students also opt to study History at GCSE and a number of students usually go on to study History at A Level. This is currently taught by Hanham Woods teachers within the wider CLF Post 16 set-up. The Curriculum we follow at Key Stages 3 is shown below:

In Years 7 and 8, students follow the CLF common core curriculum for History. They study three distinct units in each year. They are assessed by means of four multiple choice ARE tests during the course of the year and by means of one extended written assessment per term and one source evaluation assessment per term.

Year 7

Key Question Content
1. Why did William the Conqueror win the Battle of Hastings? * Edward the Confessor and the issue over succession.

* Contenders to the throne (Harold Godwinson, Harald Hardrada and

William of Normandy).

* Events before the Battle of Hastings – Battle of Stamford Bridge.

* Events at the Battle of Hastings (including William’s trick)

* The Bayeux Tapestry

2. What was the impact of the Norman Conquest on England? * The view of the Normans at William’s accession to the throne –

Anglo Saxon reaction.

* Rebellion and the Harrying of the North.

* The introduction of castles to control the population – motte and

bailey castles.

* The feudal system and its impact.

 

3. What was it like to live and die in the Middle Ages? *Life in Medieval England including life in towns, religion and entertainment.

* The arrival of the Black Death and what people at the time thought caused it.

* How people tried to cure the Black Death.

* What the consequences/impact of the Black Death were on

Medieval society including the Peasants Revolt.

4. What was the impact of the Reformation on Tudor England? * The differences between the Catholic and Protestant churches.

* The reasons why Henry made changes to the church in England –

his divorce and remarriage.

* Dissolution of the monasteries.

* The impact of the Reformation on Early Modern society – what

reaction did people have?

 

Year 8

Key Question Content
1.Is the British Empire something we should be proud of? This unit will include a study of the development of the British Empire and an exploration of both its good and bad points. Case studies will be undertaken on both the Empire and India and the Slave trade.
2. What was the experience of war like for the peoples of Europe between 1914 and 1945> * The First World War , focusing on particular on life on the western front and the Battle of the Somme.

* The Second World War – an overview of events with a depth study on the Holocaust

3. How did different groups campaign for equality in the 20th century? * Apartheid in South Africa

* Female campaigns in Britain – Suffragists and Suffragettes.

History Curriculum Overview

Qualification type: Edexcel GCSE

Additional entry requirements: A good level of literacy is required for this course and students therefore need to be on track in terms of age-related expectations for History if they are to succeed in this course. The course is concerned with historical thinking rather than just the recall of facts.

Assessment: 3 Written Examinations at the end of Year 11.

Coursework: There is no longer any coursework component for GCSE History specifications.

GCSE Course Content:

 

Component Content Assessment % of grade
Paper 1 ·       Crime and punishment in Britain c.1000 to the present

·       Whitechapel c.1870-c.1900: crime, policing and the inner city (including Jack the Ripper)

1hr 15min Exam 30%
Paper 2 ·       Superpower relations and the Cold War 1941-1991

·       Early Elizabethan England 1558-1588

1hr 45min Exam 40%
Paper 3 ·       The USA 1954-1975: conflict at home and abroad (including the US Civil Rights movement and the Vietnam War) 1hr 20min Exam 30%

Students study Crime and punishment and Elizabethan England in Year 10 and Superpower Relations and the USA 1954-1975.

Opportunities for curriculum-related activities:

Every two years – Berlin Residential Trip, aiming to deepen understanding of the Superpower Relations unit.

Revision Guide:

The department produces its own bespoke revision materials for students and all will be provided with these. Revision guides for each separate subject studied are available from the following locations or can be purchased from the school finance office:

 

Elizabethan England

Superpower Relations

America 1954-1975

Crime and Punishment

 

The Geography Curriculum Statement sets out the vision and intent for the curriculum in Geography.

The Geography Curriculum Map sets out an overview of the curriculum in Geography from Years 7 through to Year 11.  Among other things, it sets out what is studied, why it is studied, as well as the keywords needed in each year.  Students and parents are likely to find this useful.

At Hanham Woods Academy we encourage students to think like Geographers in their Geography lessons.  The Hanham Thinkers Geography poster summarises what that means.

At Hanham Woods Academy, Geography is compulsory for students at Key Stage 3. Most students also opt to study Geography at GCSE and a number of students usually go on to study Geography at A Level. This is currently taught by Hanham Woods teachers within the wider CLF Post 16 set-up.

In Years 7 and 8, students follow the CLF common core curriculum for Geography. They study three distinct units in each year. They are assessed by means of multiple choice tests during the course of the year and complete a range of extended written assessments and exam style assessments throughout the year. The Curriculum we follow at Key Stage 3 is shown below.

Year 7

Key Question Content
1. Where in the world? ·        Locate continents, oceans and use lines of latitude and longitude.

·        Use an atlas to locate places.

·        Identify and label human and physical features.

·        Locate main physical and human features of the UK.

·        Use the 8 points of the compass.

2. How do we locate our place in the world? ·        Measure distance (straight line and winding) using a scale on a map.

·        Locate place on a map using grid references, 4 fig and 6 fig.

·        Read relief on a map (the height and shape of the land). 4 key ways to show relief as below. OS maps – contours, trip points, spot heights. Physical map – layer shading.

·        To read a local OS map.

·        Describe routes using direction, symbols, grid references, distance and relief.

3. How is urbanisation changing our world? ·        The difference between rural and urban locations and use a local OS map to locate them.

·        Site factors for settlement and can explain why these were important for early settlers.

·        Settlement patterns and explain how settlements change over time using local maps.

·        Analyse the benefits and problems of the growth of settlements using our local OS map.

·        To know characteristics of each urban area (CBD, Inner city, suburb, rural-urban fringe) on a local OS map.

·        To describe and explain the problems of traffic in urban areas.

·        To evaluate the solutions to traffic problems in the local area.

·        DME – To be able to justify the location for a new motorway junction

4. Why do rivers flood and how does this affect people? ·        Label a diagram of the hydrological cycle.

·        Predict effects caused by changes to the cycle (e.g. increase in rainfall)

·        Identify aspects of the drainage basin including; watershed, tributary, confluence, source, mouth, flood plain.

·        Factors affect flood risk e.g. relief, geology, land use, vegetation and associated weather (including case studies HIC and LIC/NEE)

·        Identify primary and secondary effects of flooding.

·        Evaluation of immediate and long term responses,

·        Management of flood risk – hard and soft strategies.

 

Year 8

Key Question Content
1. How is population changing our world? ·        To describe the global distribution of population and reasons for it.

·        To describe the cause and effect of population size.

·        To describe the cause and effect of population size using a case study.

·        To explain push and pull factors and the impacts of migration

2. How is development changing our world? ·        To make a decision about how developed the UK is using geographical terms and knowledge.

·        To describe how development is measured.

·        To show how development changes with population.

·        To identify the employment structure of HICs, LICs and NEEs.

·        To play the trading game and draw conclusions based on what you found.

·        To describe the advantages and disadvantages of Fair-trade.

3. Why do Natural Hazards happen and how do they affect people? ·        Structure of the Earth: Inner core, outer core, mantle, crust, plates

·        Tectonic processes and landforms at each plate margin: Constructive, destructive and conservative margins.

·        What is an earthquake? How is it measured?

·        What is a volcano?

·        Identify the features of a tsunami

·        Explain the cause, impacts and responses of a tsunami. (e.g. Indian Ocean 2004)

·        Explain how we can reduce the risks of hazards.

·        features of a tropical storm

·        formation of a tropical storm

·        Describe the cause, effects and response to a tropical storm (e.g. Hurricane Katrina)

4. How is Brazil changing? ·        Locate Brazil using an atlas.

·        To understand Brazil’s main physical features.

·        To explore push and pull factors in Brazil.

·        Different ways of measuring Brazil’s development.

·        To understand why Brazil is known as the land of contrasts.

·        To design a new sustainable settlement in Brazil.

·        To explore the amazon rainforest and to examine what life is like there.

·        How do animals adapt to living in tropical rainforests?

·        To explore the importance of rainforests so that we understand why we need them.

·        To understand how the Kayapo people live.

·        To explore and evaluate the threats to the rainforest.

·        Should the Belo Monte dam be built?

·        To find out what happened to Chico Mendez.

Geography Curriculum Overview

 

Geography Curriculum Overview

Qualification type: AQA Geography

Additional entry requirements: A good level of literacy, mathematics and geographical application is required along with the ability to study independently. The ability to apply geographical theory to a range of concepts is a must

Assessment: 3 Written Examinations at the end of Year 11.

Component Content Assessment % of grade
Paper 1

Physical Environment

Section AThe Challenge of Natural Hazards -Natural Hazards, Tectonic Hazards, Weather Hazards, Climate Change

Section BThe Living World – Ecosystems, Tropical Rainforests

Section CPhysical Landscapes in the UK – UK Physical Landscapes, Coastal Landscapes, River Landscapes

1hr 30min Exam 35%
Paper 2

Human

Environment

 

Section AUrban Issues and Challenges – Urbanisation, Mega Cities, Rio de Janerio and Bristol

Section BThe Changing Economic World – Development, Nigeria – In depth study, UK’s Economy

Section CThe Challenge of Resource Management – Global distribution of resources, UK – Food, water and energy, Global water supply

1hr 30min Exam 35%
Paper 3 Geographical Application

 

Section A – Issue Evaluation – Pre-release material released 12 weeks before the exam covering one of the topics studied. Analyse and interpret in class and then questions on the related issue

Section B – Fieldwork – General fieldwork techniques and your geographical enquiry

1hr 30min Exam 30%

 

There are two compulsory fieldwork days that are required to be undertaken so that students can gain real life experience of geographical fieldwork to two contrasting environments. This will form part of Paper 3 assessment.

Revision Guide:  The department produces its own bespoke revision materials for students and all will be provided with these. Revision guides for each separate subject studied are available from Amazon.

 

The PRE Curriculum Statement sets out the vision and intent for the curriculum in Philosophy, Religion & Ethics (PRE).

The PRE Curriculum Map sets out an overview of the curriculum in Philosophy, Religion & Ethics (PRE) from Years 7 through to Year 11.  Among other things, it sets out what is studied, why it is studied, as well as the keywords needed in each year.  Students and parents are likely to find this useful.

At Hanham Woods Academy we encourage students to think like a Philosopher and a Theologian in their Philosophy, Religion & Ethics (PRE) lessons.  The Hanham Thinkers PRE poster summarises what that means.

Religious Studies Curriculum Overview

Religion is also a big part of our history and this can mean that, in changing times, an understanding of it is vital for young people in helping them to understand our world. Societies where people understand philosophy, ethics and a variety of religious beliefs are societies which will avoid making the mistakes of the past and will continue to enrich the societies in which we live.

At Hanham Woods, we believe that the issues within this subject are important for all the above reasons and more. We also believe that, for individual students, it is important, not just for the knowledge it teaches us, but for the skills it helps young people to develop. Young people who have studied philosophy, ethics and religion usually developed a number of transferable skills such as the ability to think logically, the ability to argue a case both orally and on paper, a passion for what’s right and wrong in our world and some societies, the ability to draw conclusions from a belief or philosophy, to differentiate between truth, belief and opinion while also realising that some groups have the ability to engage in some philosophies that may be way outside the general beliefs and values of others and can cause conflict and divisions within societies. Students with a good PRE qualifications along with the other skills they gain often go on to careers within the social sciences, the Law and Politics, Charity work, Education and work to empower and help many of those in society who cannot always help themselves.

At Hanham Woods, PRE is compulsory for students at Key Stage 3. Some students also opt to study PRE at GCSE and some go on to study PRE-at A Level along with other like-minded subjects to develop rewarding careers within our varying societies worldwide. This is currently taught by Hanham Woods and other teachers within the wider CLF Post 16 set-up.

In Years 7 and 8, students follow the CLF common core curriculum for religious studies. They study three distinct units in each year. They are assessed by means of four multiple choice ARE tests during the course of the year and by means of one extended written assessment per term and one source evaluation assessment per term. The Curriculum we follow at Key Stage 3 is shown below:

Year 7

Key Question Content
1.      introduction

What do the Abrahamic Faiths have in common?

Stories from the Torah. Including the stories about these people. Abraham, Moses,

  1. What do you already know?
  2. What questions would you like to ask?
Creation

Are Adam and Eve good role models?

Noah

Describing religious stories and practices. Describe the two creation stories in Genesis. Explain reasons for Adam and Eve being good or bad role models

Describe the story of Noah’s Ark and the covenant in it

Generate opinions about the story and give reasons to support these

Abraham

Is Abraham a good role model?

Moses

Is Moses a good role model?

 

Outline the story of the prophet Abraham. Describe the story of Abraham and Isaac, interpret what the meaning of this story could be.

Outline the story of the prophet Moses.

Discuss whether Moses was a good role model or not.

The Law

What do the stories of the 10 Commandments and the Golden Calf teach?

Assessment

“Are the Abrahamic prophets are good role models”

Outline the story of the prophet Abraham. Describe the story of Abraham and Isaac, interpret what the meaning of this story could be.

Revise our learning about the Abrahamic prophets

Explain what a believer might learn from the story of Moses.

 

Year 8

Key Question Content
1.what happens after we die? This unit will include a look at life after death from the six major world faiths, their beliefs and practices.
2. What do Sikhs believe? Looking at key Sikh beliefs and practices
3. How do we know what’s good and what’s evil? Describing good and evil through religious stories and practices.

 

Qualification type: WJEC EDUQAS GCSE (9-1)

Additional entry requirements: A good level of literacy is required for this course and students therefore need to be on track in terms of age-related expectations for PRE if they are to succeed in this course. The course is concerned with comparing and contrasting different beliefs and values while studying Christianity and Islam, considering differing viewpoint on topics, rather than just the recall of facts.

Assessment: there are 3 components within the examinations at the end of Year 11.

Component 1: Relationships, Life and Death, Good and Evil and Human Rights

Component 2: Compulsory study of Christianity -Beliefs, Teachings and practices

Component 3: Study of Islam -Beliefs, Teachings and practices

Coursework: There is no longer any coursework component for GCSE PRE specifications.

GCSE Course Content:

Component Content Assessment % of grade
Paper 1 ·       Relationships

·       Life and Death

·       Good and Evil

·       Human Rights

2hr Exam 50%
Paper 2 ·       Compulsory study of Christianity -Beliefs, Teachings and practices 1hr Exam 25%
Paper 3 ·       Compulsory study of Islam -Beliefs, Teachings and practices 1hr Exam 25%

Students study Components 2 and 3 in Year 10 and component 1 in Year 11

Opportunities for curriculum-related activities: Local trips to a Mosque and Church

Revision Guide:

The students are given Topic booklets from the revision guide as their homework’s as we progress through each topic, they bring it to be marked before the end of the unit so it will then produce the whole revision guide for them to use at the end of the course. The Revision guide for this subject is available from the following locations or can be purchased from the school finance office:

Amazon

eBay